Since May 2007, many manufactories of beverage’s cans have replaced the “standard can” with a new one, named “sleek can”. The traditional can now changes its shape, becoming taller and slimmer, but containing the same volume of beverage (33 cl). The total volume of a sleek can results smaller than the total volume of a standard can. A study on mechanical behavior of cans subjected to controlled thermal loads was carried out. The aim of the present work is to experimentally study the strains field on both types of can and different types of commercial beverages, and to identify the most dangerous condition. Experimental tests were executed realizing either a thermal shock or a gradual increase of temperature. A finite elements model was implemented. Strains obtained from experimental tests were compared with the numerical ones and the stress field of the can was evaluated. The soft drinks considered were sprite and coke. They are very common soft drinks, widely appreciated by young consumers. So it becomes fundamental that the cans are not only functional but also safe. In fact, drinks containing a considerable quantity of carbon dioxide (5.4 g/l of CO2 for coke and 7.2 g/l CO2 for sprite), can be considered a sort of pressure tanks because shaking the beverage or increasing the temperature, produces a growth of the gas pressure on the can walls. An experiment was simulated: it was supposed to leave a can in a car during a sunny day. The temperature reached was higher than 70 °C (in south of Italy in September). A preliminary test was executed and it was observed that heating with hot domestic water, the can end was violently removed from the can body, hitting the operator. For this reason an-in-depth study was conducted.

Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Beverage’s Cans Thermal Shocked

BARILE, Claudia;TURSI, Francesca
2011

Abstract

Since May 2007, many manufactories of beverage’s cans have replaced the “standard can” with a new one, named “sleek can”. The traditional can now changes its shape, becoming taller and slimmer, but containing the same volume of beverage (33 cl). The total volume of a sleek can results smaller than the total volume of a standard can. A study on mechanical behavior of cans subjected to controlled thermal loads was carried out. The aim of the present work is to experimentally study the strains field on both types of can and different types of commercial beverages, and to identify the most dangerous condition. Experimental tests were executed realizing either a thermal shock or a gradual increase of temperature. A finite elements model was implemented. Strains obtained from experimental tests were compared with the numerical ones and the stress field of the can was evaluated. The soft drinks considered were sprite and coke. They are very common soft drinks, widely appreciated by young consumers. So it becomes fundamental that the cans are not only functional but also safe. In fact, drinks containing a considerable quantity of carbon dioxide (5.4 g/l of CO2 for coke and 7.2 g/l CO2 for sprite), can be considered a sort of pressure tanks because shaking the beverage or increasing the temperature, produces a growth of the gas pressure on the can walls. An experiment was simulated: it was supposed to leave a can in a car during a sunny day. The temperature reached was higher than 70 °C (in south of Italy in September). A preliminary test was executed and it was observed that heating with hot domestic water, the can end was violently removed from the can body, hitting the operator. For this reason an-in-depth study was conducted.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11589/110390
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